Malfouf (Cabbage Rolls)

Malfouf (Cabbage Rolls)

Adapted By Rebecca White from Tamara Abuomar

Author note: Malfouf is a Jordanian cabbage roll. Recently, I had the honor to learn how to make this Jordanian dish from my friend and neighbor. Together, we wrote Tamara’s family recipe down for readers like you. This version of malfouf has been adapted for the electric pressure cooker. Depending on preference, feel free to peel the garlic cloves or not. Be prepared to remove any hard stems or undercooked parts of the cabbage leaves. Some leaves will not cook evenly due to the thick stem that is found in cabbage. Larger leaves may need to be halved. Any remaining filling can be frozen if using fresh ground beef and any remaining cabbage leaves can also be frozen (plastic bags are a good storage container). To read more about Jordanian food, read my article in The Dallas Morning News.

1 head green cabbage

3/4 pounds ground beef

3-4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 1/2 cups basmati rice, uncooked

3 teaspoons Himalayan salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper (or more to taste)

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

2 teaspoons ground cardamom

10 garlic cloves, crushed

juice from 4 lemons

  1. Slice the bottom layer off of the base of the cabbage. Make four indentions around the stem of the cabbage to allow water to seep in to thoroughly cook the interior.
  2. Fill a stock pot with water and bring to boil and reduce to a simmer. Place the cabbage into the stock pot and cook until softened, rotating and pushing off layers of leaves while cooking over medium-low heat, about 20 minutes.
  3. Remove the cabbage and place into a colander. Place the colander on top of a large stock pot. Let the cabbage strain for 10-15 minutes. Set aside.
  4. Place the ground beef, olive oil, uncooked rice, salt, pepper, cinnamon and ground cardamom into a large mixing bowl. Mix well until combined. If the mixture seems dry, add additional olive oil. This mixture needs to be fragrant. Add additional cardamom and cinnamon to preferrence.
  5. Take a cabbage leaf and place a small amount (1-2 teaspoons) of the beef mixture into the bottom third of the cabbage leaf. Roll until the beef mixture is completely covered. Squeeze the rolled cabbage leaf in your hand. This will help to spread the rice and beef mixture throughout the leaf. Place seam-side down. Continue this process until all the cabbage leaves are used.
  6. Place the cabbage rolls into the Instant Pot insert and create one solid layer of rolls. Add a few garlic cloves and a generous sprinkling of cardamom. Continue this process until all cabbage leaves are used. Fill with water until the last layer of rolls is barely covered.
  7. Secure with the lid and cook on high pressure for 7 minutes. Release pressure naturally (10-15 minutes). Gently strain excess liquid and remove malfouf from the Instant Pot. Serve with lemon juice and salt to taste.

Broiled Asparagus with Pickled Red Onions and Soft Boiled Eggs

Broiled Asparagus with Pickled Red Onions and Soft-Boiled Eggs

Author note: Be sure to make the pickled red onions the day before.

2 bundles asparagus, thick bottom stalk removed

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

5-6 eggs

pickled red onions (see recipe below)

Dijon mustard

Manchego or gruyere cheese, cut into strips

French baguette, sliced and toasted

  1. Heat the broiler to 550 degrees.
  2. Place the asparagus on a foil lined sheet pan. Pour the olive oil and the salt on top of the asparagus. Using tongs, turn the asparagus to coat.
  3. Place the asparagus into the oven and broil, 6-10 minutes. Remove when asparagus have reached the desired doneness.
  4. Meanwhile, bring a pan of water to boil. Place the eggs into the boiling water and boil for 9 minutes. Immediately remove the eggs and place into an ice bath. Cool for 4 minutes. Peel the eggs and slice in half.
  5. Place the asparagus and boiled eggs onto a platter. Serve with pickled red onions, manchego or gruyere cheese, Dijon and crusty bread.

for the Pickled Red Onions

1 cup white distilled vinegar

2 cups water

1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

3 garlic cloves, crushed

2 red onions, halved and sliced

  1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt and sugar into a small saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat until the salt and sugar has dissolved.
  2. Place the red pepper flakes, garlic cloves and red onions into a large canning jar. Pour the vinegar mixture over the onions and bring to room temperature. Seal with a lid and store in the fridge.

Loaded Tater Tots

Loaded Tater Tots

2 bags frozen tater tots

3-4 cups sausage, cut into bite-sized pieces

your favorite queso recipe (store bought or homemade!)

fresh cilantro, chopped

2 cups pickles, cut into bite-sized pieces

  1. Place the tater tots onto a sheet pan and cook according to instructions. Place the sausage onto a foil-lined sheet pan. During the last 10 minutes of tater tot cook time, place the sausage into the oven to warm through.
  2. While the tater tots are cooking, warm the queso.
  3. Remove the tater tots and sausage from the oven. Place sausage onto the sheet pan with the tater tots. Top with cilantro and serve with pickles and queso.

Smoked Shrimp

Cold, crisp days are some of the best. They are made even better when the air is mingled with a waft of slow burning wood and slow smoking meat.

Smoking meats have become one of my husband’s hobbies. From brisket to chicken to pork, almost every month there is a smoked meat on the calendar. And every month Market Street continues to provide the best selection of products to choose from: wood smoking chips, meat, thermometers, spice rubs (the list is so long!).We love this outdoor cooking activity. It gets the family outside and it makes our outdoor living space a kitchen as well.

Recently we have dived into smoking fish. Salmon has been our focus, but I’ve had a hankering to try shrimp.Smoking shrimp is not as time consuming as it is with a terrain animal. This shellfish is small and lightweight. If you’re looking for a quick smoke, and one that is unique, shrimp is for you.

Begin with selecting a quality shrimp. The fish monger at Market Street has a beautiful supply of shrimp from which to select. Ask the fish monger which shrimp they would suggest to smoke—they have a wealth of knowledge about seafood!After a quick coat in spices and oil, the shrimp is ready to sit in the smoker for about 45 minutes to one hour.

A fun aspect of adding Smoked Shrimp to your monthly menu is Market Street’s ample supply of grilling rubs and seafood condiments. The barbecue rubs to the condiments makes smoked shrimp unique not only in the cooking method, but also in its service as well.

Here’s to a weekend of outdoor smoking—may the outside be cold and the smoked shrimp delicious!

Smoked Shrimp

Author note: This recipe calls for a barbeque rub that contains no salt. To ensure this, read the ingredients on the back of the bottle. If you do use a barbeque rub that has salt in the ingredients omit the 1 1/2 teaspoons of kosher salt. After smoking the shrimp, salt to taste. When smoking shrimp, use a fruit or light flavored wood.

2 pounds raw, peeled shrimp

4 tablespoons extra- virgin olive oil

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt (plus more to taste)

3 teaspoons favorite no-salt barbeque rub

salted butter, melted

lemon wedges

  1. Prepare the grill for smoking and heat to 225 degrees.
  2. Place the olive oil, kosher salt and grill rub in a large bowl. Mix well. Add the shrimp to the mixture and stir to thoroughly coat the shrimp with the mixture. Let marinade for 30 minutes.
  3. Place the shrimp into the smoking set-up. Smoke for 45 minutes or up to 1 hour. Remove and salt to taste. Serve warm, room temperature or cold with lemon wedges and warm melted butter.

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post on behalf of Market Street. All opinions are my own.

DESSERT FEED

Sweeten up your weekend with these sugary treats. From tart to chocolate every sweet tooth should be satisfied.

Enjoy the sugar rush!

xo,

Rebecca

Candied Marshmallows

Nerds Ice CreamPeach Tea Popsicles

Cherry Cobbler

Spiced Apple Upside Down Cake

Chocolate Chip Dessert Shooters

Rose Honey Latte

Rose Honey Latte

2 cups whole milk

1/4 teaspoon rose water

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

3 tablespoons honey

1 egg

  1. Add the honey and egg in a medium heat proof bowl. Mix well.
  2. In a small pan, heat the milk, vanilla extract and rosewater on medium-low for 15 minutes.
  3. Temper the egg and honey with the warm milk by adding 1/4 cup of milk at a time to the egg mixture, whisking constantly. Continue this process until all the milk is used.
  4. Place the liquid into a blender and blitz until frothy. Pour into warm mugs and serve immediately.

Sheet Pan Mediterranean Turkey Patties with Spiced Cauliflower Rice

Sheet Pan Mediterranean Turkey Patties with Spiced Cauliflower Rice

Author note: For a quick cleanup, line the rimmed baking sheet with foil.

1 pound ground turkey

1 teaspoon zaatar

1 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

3 tablespoons hummus

1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs

1 egg

1 pound cauliflower rice

1 1/2 teaspoon cumin

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Greek yogurt, for topping

  1. Place the oven rack right below the broiler. Heat broiler to 550 degrees.
  2. Spray a large rimmed cookie sheet with canola oil.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the ground turkey, Worcestershire sauce, zaatar, 1 teaspoon salt, Worcestershire, hummus, panko breadcrumbs and egg. Stir well. Using a ice cream scoop, scoop out balls of the ground turkey mixture. Place onto one half of the baking sheet. Gently press down on the meatballs to create flat patties.
  4. In a bowl, combine the cauliflower rice, olive oil, cumin and ½ teaspoon salt. Stir well to combine. Place on the other half of the rimmed baking sheet.
  5. Broil for 4 minutes, then flip and broil the other side for an additional 3-4 minutes or until the turkey patties reach 165 degrees. Stir the cauliflower rice twice.
  6. Remove from the oven. Serve the turkey patties and cauliflower rice with Greek yogurt, fresh lemon wedges and kalamata olives.

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